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RE: ICD-11 Beta draft – 6D11 Gaming disorder

Gaming disorder is characterized by a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour (‘digital gaming’ or ‘video-gaming’), which may be online (i.e., over the internet) or offline, manifested by: 1) impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context); 2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities; and 3) continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences. The behaviour pattern is of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning. The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent. The gaming behaviour and other features are normally evident over a period of at least 12 months in order for a diagnosis to be assigned, although the required duration may be shortened if all diagnostic requirements are met and symptoms are severe.

1) impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context);
As opposed to impaired control over your own body; many young people go out and become inebriated and make sexual contact, even fornicate, with each other. Enjoying a digital work of art & science saves people from making costly life mistakes they will later regret. Those who attempt to run from their pasts are often running from regrets. Fight me. Duration of gaming might be the primary area to monitor.

2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities;
There is something to be said for hygiene and daily maintenance of your body, and excessive investment in any activity to the point of obsession/addiction can cause a deterioration in the individual’s overall physical health.

3) continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences.
Not certain what negative consequences this point is referring to other than the individual’s physical health. The real world’s negative consequences (game mechanics) are much more punishing. Perhaps the individual should be employed, or in school, at all times, creating a balance between the digital and physical worlds.

“Significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning.”
Impairments

  • Personal: most likely to occur in the area of personal hygiene and sleep.
  • Family: individuals are alone in their gaming rooms (often bedrooms), but their families know where they are. They are safe.
  • Social: individuals often game with friends, and games are written and created by large teams—teams of human beings, that (often) teach valuable lessons.
  • Educational: individuals might invest time in gaming, sacrificing studying time. This is definitely not good and should be monitored.
  • Occupational: a time investment deficit in education will lead to occupational disappointment.
  • Other: individuals may find it difficult to function in the real world— e.g. sports, and physical activities, warning signs might be: hygiene and Body Mass Index.

The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent.
Eventually, individuals learn about motivations, rewards, music, visual art, coding, and storytelling. It’s an art form that is already appreciated globally.

The gaming behaviour and other features are normally evident over a period of at least 12 months in order for a diagnosis to be assigned, although the required duration may be shortened if all diagnostic requirements are met and symptoms are severe.
Severe deterioration in personal hygiene, sleep, school performance being good indicators of a problem.

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